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ONITSHA RIVER SIDE
ONITSHA RIVER SIDE

The name of the City of Damascus (Hebrew: דַּמֶּשֶׂק ; transliteration: dĕmesheq; meaning, ‘a well watered
place’; Igbo language: Damascus: ide ama si akụ ose, meaning, ‘flooded settlement from near the riverbank’; Aramaic: ( דמשק ); transliteration: Dammaśq; Qumranic; transliteration: Darmeśeq; Egyptian: T-ms-ḳw), referred to the modern city of Onitsha in Anambra State, Nigeria, where we have the river niger. which was also called in the Bible Antioch (Igbo language: anị otu ọcha meaning ‘land of white sand by the riverside’). The modern-day Antioch is about 24 km inland of the Mediterranean sea in present-day Turkey just north of Syria. It is about 795 km from modern Jerusalem, which makes the distance impossible to cover for the disciples in a short time fleeing from persecution in Jerusalem.


Rather, the disciples fled from ancient Jerusalem (Igbo language: iyī e rusala m, meaning ‘evil should
not touch me’, the modern city of Owerri, Imo State Nigeria), to modern city of Onitsha, ancient
Antioch (Igbo language: anị otu ọcha meaning ‘land of white sand by the riverside’), a distance of
80 km, which is realistic.

The nearby city of Nnewi (Igbo language: A nụna iwe meaning ‘we have heard the annoyance’), was called Nineveh (Igbo language: a nụna iwe Iho, meaning ‘they heeded to the annoyance of the Divine Light’). The prophet who later obeyed God to preach to the people of
Nnewi to hear the annoyance of God was called Jonah (Igbo language: ya a nụ Iho, meaning, ‘he
obeyed the Divine Light’), as described in [Jonah 3:1–10], in contrast to when he disobeyed God in
[Jonah 1:17].

The complexity is in the very nature of Igbo language. For example, the city called Nineveh or
Nainawah was mistransliterated and incorrectly vowelized consonants N-n-w-h, taken from the Igbo
words: a nụna iwe Iho, meaning ‘they heeded to the annoyance of the Divine Light’. However, the
object form of this subject expression of penitence was expressed in the same consonants: ọnụnụ
ọwa ọha meaning ‘ashy remains of the candle sticks of the plant called ọha (Pterocarpus: Canna indica L.)’. The plant whose leaves serve as a highly prized vegetable for soup preparations in Igbo land to this day is also used as a boundary demarcation for land portions in living areas. \

The people of Nineveh took the ashes from the wood of this plant and spread it all over themselves. This act
would be said in Igbo language: ntụ a ghara, meaning ‘ashes spread out’, for the subject expression:
ntụgharị, meaning ‘reversal or change’, which is a symbol of penitential rite. The latter is an example
of what I called the Igbo object form figurative writing, still in use in Igbo land to this day.


In Igbo tradition as with the biblical names, the names were given for what happened to the person
or to the parents in the circumstances of birth or life of the people called Hebrew (Igbo language: ọha
e bu ụrụ ụwa, meaning ‘the people who bear the wickedness of the world’).

ABOUT PAUL OR SAUL

The name Saul (Igbo language: Saa olu, meaning ‘answer this voice’) refers to Paul’s call by Our Lord Jesus: [Acts 9:4] ‘Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me.’ The call was on the way from Jerusalem (Igbo language: iyī e rusala m, meaning ‘let evil not touch me’), which is present-day
Owerri town, to Damascus (Hebrew: דַּמֶּשֶׂק ; transliteration: dĕmesheq; meaning, ‘a well-watered place’; Igbo language: Damascus: ide ama si akụ ose, meaning, ‘flooded settlement from near the riverbank’; Aramaic: [ דמשק ]; transliteration: Dammaśq; Qumranic; transliteration: Darmeśeq; Egyptian: T-ms-ḳw) present-day Onitsha town, he was stopped at a town close to Onitsha, now called Ihiala (Igbo language: Ihe ala, meaning ‘light from the surroundings’), as recounted in [Acts 9:3]: Now as he was going along and approaching Damascus, suddenly a light from heaven flashed around
him. Saul would later have his name change. He would be called Paul (Igbo language: apa olu,meaning ‘voice of unbeliever’) from his past, referring to his persecution of Christians.

Paul was said to be called on his way to Damascus from Jerusalem in his quest to kill ‘people of the way’. The
word ‘people of the Way’ (Igbo language: ndị ụzọ meaning ‘people of the way’) arose because of a mistransliteration resulting from the same consonants. Rather, what was meant in the original Igbo language biblical text was ‘people who are saved’ (Igbo language: ndị a zọọ, meaning ‘those who are saved’). The believer sent to Paul [Acts 9:10] was called Ananias (Igbo language: ‘anịnị isi’
meaning, ‘lowest value coin about quarter of a penny’) is a nickname because of the coin that was collected for the Bishop of Damascus (Hebrew: דַּמֶּשֶׂק ; transliteration: dĕmesheq; meaning, ‘a well watered place’; Igbo language: Damascus: ide ama si akụ ose, meaning, ‘flooded settlement from near the riverbank’; Aramaic: [ דמשק ]; transliteration: Dammaśq; Qumranic; transliteration:Darmeśeq; Egyptian: T-ms-ḳw) (modern-day Onitsha) and Bishop of Jerusalem (modern-day
Owerri), hence, Ananias was also the nickname for the other bishops by the people.

THE 666 MYSTERY

However, there would be no other place where the mistransliterations and mistranslations of the
original biblical Igbo text caused more misunderstanding than in the book of Revelation, creating myths that make no rational sense. For example, the infamous number 666 reported in [Revelation 13:18]: This called for wisdom: let anyone with understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a person. Its number is six hundred and sixty-six. This is an example of Igbo
numerology writing, the number 666 (Igbo language: narị isii, iri isii na isii meaning ‘666’) has the same consonants as the expression of the end-time conflict between God and satan, (Igbo language: naara ese eri, ese a na-ese, meaning ‘took on the conflict from time immemorial, the conflict that has been on’).

In [Revelation 19:20]: And the beast was captured, and with it the false prophet who had performed in its presence the signs by which he deceived those who had received the mark of the beast and those who worshipped its image.

The expression ‘mark of the beast’ (Igbo language: akara
anụmanụ, meaning ‘mark of the beast’) are the object forms of the subject expression (with the same
consonants) about those that do not listen to the Wisdom of God (Igbo language: akara a nụụ Ama
Enu, meaning ‘narration in which you do not hear the Wisdom from above’). It will suffice to say that
the latter meaning is more appropriate in the overall context of Revelation describing the end-time
events leading to Judgement Day.

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